Our balanced regime for food

Earth and Sky

Olivier Boyer, thérapeute holistique
By Olivier Boyer, holistic therapist

In traditional Oriental medicines, “man” (in the broadest sense of the term: the human) is positioned between the Sky and Earth.

They constantly and simultaneously received energy from these 2 elements and, in fact, must bear and abide by the laws that govern them.

Great Oriental doctors have studied and codified these laws for centuries, adapting them to “man” so that they can live in harmony with nature and the universe.

They managed to define principles and laws, such as the universal principle (Yin Yang), and the Universal Vital Energy (QI).

Universal Vital Energy: QI

QI comes from breathing and eating, energy and material. That is to say 2 contrary things, 2 polarities.

The upper part signifies: Air. Vapor. On the rise.
This corresponds to Yang.
The lower part signifies: Field of Grain (rice). Earth.
This corresponds to Yin.The universal principle of Yin Yang

There is always a balance and a precarious interdependence between the Yin and the Yang.

For example

Masculine Feminine
Day Night
Up Down
Hot Cold

There is always a bit of Yin in Yang and Yang in Yin, which explains the symbol:

Here are a few definitions:

YIN

YANG

Night Day
Darkness Light
Cold Heat
Winter Summer
Water Fire
Moon Sun
Feminine Masculine
Presence Absence
Concrete Virtual
Earth Sky
Emptiness Fulfillment
Rest Movement
Deficient Excess
Calming Exciting

Each of these relationship changes just as the natural light during the course of a day.

The 5 levels of Yin and Yang

Different levels of Yin and Yang have been defined:

Ultra Yin

Yin

Neutral

Yang

Ultra Yang

The great Oriental doctors have linked the seasons and natural elements to correspond to these 5 levels. For each season and element, they have laid out a multitude of information to explain, as carefully as possible, to what each corresponds: Colors, planets, musical notes, organs, meridians, psychological profiles, qualities, defects, predispositions to disease… etc. There’s no limit …

General Classifications (some examples)

Classification

Winter

Fall

Indian Summer

Spring

Summer

Elements Water Metal Soil Wood Fire
Organs Kidney
Bladder
Lung
Large intestine
Spleen
Lungs
Stomach
Liver
Gallbladder
Heart
Small intestine
Colors Black White Yellow Green Red
Flavors Salty Spicy Sweet/Sugary Sour Bitter

This is the classic classification by element, which the Chinese have ordered, and could be made complete with planets, musical sounds, semiprecious stones, etc.
Here, the flavor is the one that reinforces the element.

Yin and Yang in food: Oriental energy nutrition

Classification

Ultra
Yin

Yin

Neutral

Yang

Ultra
Yang

Flavor Bitter Salty Sour Sweet Sugary Spice
Cooking Method Roast
Fry
Gratiner
Grill
Sauté
Braise
Steam
Boil
In a Papillotte
Simmer
Blanch
Poach
Raw
Fermented
Effects Internalize Descend Neutral Ascend Externalize

This table describes the flavors’ effects on the body.

This classification applies to food through:

  • Flavors (spicy, sour, salty, bitter)
  • State (cold, cool, neutral, warm, hot)
  • The effect of food on the movements of energy (externalizing, internalizing, descending …)
  • The effect of food on organs (liver, lungs, the spleen …)
  • The seasonal characteristics of food
  • Method of cooking (grill, boil, blanchir …)

 

This concept constitutes a major difference between Western food and Oriental energetic nutrition.

The latter does not only care about the chemical or biological analysis of each food.

It’s based on the observation and study of the role and effects of each food (or food group) on humans, including:

  • Physical balance
  • Physiology
  • The psychic state
  • The energetic state

This is a comprehensive and holistic vision: food is not only to feed the body but to maintain it in all its components.

Classification applied to some foods

 

Classification

Ultra Yin

Yin

Neutral

Yang

Ultra Yang

Nature Cold Cool Neutral Warm Hot
Animal Product Crab
Sea Urchin
Snail
Egg White
Oyster
Caviar
Yogurt
Mussels
Shellfish
Low-Fat Cheese ( Ex: Goat Cheese)
Duck
Carp
Quail
Cow Milk
Honey
Perch
Lemon Sole
Angler Fish
Coley
Sea Bream
Mackerel
Sardine
Herring
Anchovies
Butter
Beef
Salmon
Shrimp
Tuna
Sheep
Chicken
Turkey
Crème Fraîche
Rich Cheeses (Ex: Burrata)
Lobster
Jumbo Shrimp
Cold Meats
Big Gme
Sheep
Veal
Vegetables & Grains Seaweed
Asparagus
Celery
Sorrel
Soybean Sprouts
Bamboo Shoots
Rhubarde
Tomatoes
Chinese Cabbage
Pumpkin
Cucumber
Endive
Turnip
Jerusalem Artichoke
Eggplant
Wheat
Kohlrabi
Tofu
Spinach
Cucumber
Radish
Barley
Red Bean
Lettuce
Corn
Buckwheat
Millet
White Rice
Aguki
Peanut
Oats
Carrot
Rye
Peas
Brown Rice
Potatoes
Sesame
Fava Bean
Sunflower Seed
Green Bean
Cabbage
Garlic
Caper
Fennel
Pumpkin
Onion
Barley
Millet
Lentils
Oyster Mushrooms
Leeks
Pumpkin
Hazelnuts
Wallnuts
Glutinous Rice
Wholegrain Pasta
Green Bell Pepper
Red Bell Pepper
Spices and condiments Soy Sauce
Salt
Tea
Sugar Cane
Chamomile
Passion Flower
Jasmine
Lime Tree
Sesame Oil
Mint
Oregano
Chamomile
Cider
Sea Salt
Green Tea
Lemongrass
Vervain
Nuoc-Nam
Oils
Orange Blossom
Licorice
Honey
Saffron
White Sugar
Chervil
Turmeric
Anis
Basil
Coffee
Red Wine
Dill
Cinnamon
Scallions
Cardamom
Cilantro
Ginger
Cloves
Thyme
Soybean Oil
Parsley
Brown Sugar
Nutmeg
Vinegar
Beer
Rosemary
Strong Alcohol
Garlic
Dry Ginger
Chili Pepper
Pepper
Nutmeg
Cocoa
Chocolate
White Wine
Refined Sugar
Sourdaux
Fruits & Citrus Pineapple
Lemon
Banana
Blackberry
Blackcurrant
Blueberry
Watermelon
Grapefruit
Mango
Melon
Orange
Pear
Apple
Plum
Fig
Strawberry
Grapefruit
Pomegranate
Papaya
Plum
Apricot
Strawberry
Cerise
Lychee
Chestnut
Wallnut
Peach
Pistachio
n/a

 

The vitality of food

Ideally, we should consume foods that have the maximum of Yin.

In fact, if foods are altered too much, devitalized too much, it is from our own reserves that we will have to draw energy, and in the long run it will weaken us.

The vitality of food essentially depends on the method of cultivation. The more natural the cultivation is, the higher the level of Yin.

The flow of energy in the human body

 

Important points for an ideal meal

The environment

  • The climate: season, temperature
  • The setting:
    * Ambiance / color / facilities
    * Try to eliminate stress, stimulations, noises
    with, for example, soft background music
  • Product’s appearance and presentation

Harmonize your choice of food

  • Promotes neutral types of foods
  • Take into account the seasons, for example:
    * Winter: neutral, warm foods
    * Summer: neutral, fresh foods
  • Show interest in food specifics (vitality, flavor, consistency, preparation)

Find balance while preparing meals

  • No “too much“: too sweet, too sour, too salty …
  • No “not enough”: dishes will become tasteless without a little pleasure

Find a balance in the stomach

Optimize your stomach’s activity without spending too much energy, the ideal schema is:

  • 50% solid food
  • 25% liquid foods
  • 25% empty (so the stomach is not completely saturated)

Respect the nutrition pyramid

The bottom of the pyramid shows the preferred food families, then those that are tolerated in the middle, and at the top, those that are to be consumed occasionally.

GAIA THERAPEAT Nutritional Charter

We’ve come to see that food through traditional Chinese medicine includes:

  • A concern for the vitality of food
  • The importance of food’s nature
  • A respect for the seasons
  • Implications of flavors
  • The importance of food processing, according to the method of cooking

In order to respect the rules detailed above and maintain food hygiene, GAIA THERAPEAT commits to:

Avoid imbalances

  • Excess “cold” foods (consumed too cold, or of a “”cool/cold”” nature)
  • Excess animal or vegetal saturated fats
  • Excess meat consumption
  • Excess of devitalized foods
  • Excess of refined products (those devoid of nutrients)
  • Addition of new substances (preservatives, additives, dyes …)
  • Imbalance of flavor due to being “too much” or “not enough” (sweet, sour, salty …)

Respect the basic rules

  • Eat more fruits and vegetables, cooked and varied
  • Consume more leguminous grains
  • such as: rice, millet, quinoa, polenta, barley, lentils, beans, soybeans, etc…
  • and avoid: wheat, rye, spelt, and oats
  • Minimize cold meats
  • Moderate consumption of meat, fish, and eggs
  • Avoid quick-burning sugars as much as possible (white sugar containing products)
  • Avoid sweet, sour, and alcoholic drinks including soda and cola
  • Reduce the vinegars, capers, and pickles
  • Reduce raw food raw and “cold nature”
  • Avoid frying
  • Avoid refined vegetable oils and animal fats
  • Reduce dairy to a minimum
  • Hot drink after a meal but not in excess

Objective of GAIA THERAPEAT

According to Oriental nutrition standards, the foundation of a good balance and good health is through a trio of organs: Spleen. Pancreas. Stomach.

Our recipes are based on these standards. Their composition has been adapted to 8 Universes thanks to a precise selection of foods, without forgetting taste and creativity.

 


Olivier Boyer, nutritionniste GAIA TherapeatOlivier BOYER, holistic therapist

From a young age, Olivier Boyer has been passionate about sports. When it came time to choose his course of study, he naturally turned to physical therapy. He uncovered knowledge of the physical body and its functions: how to rebuild the damaged, injured or suffering. He discovered massage, as well as oils and their virtues.

After a few years, he began to notice the limitations of physical appearance in therapy and decided to educate himself on the importance of mindset, spirituality, and energy. He discovered biokinergie, Chinese traditional medicine, Doctor Bach’s floral elixirs, colortherapie, Auriculotherapy, meditation, visualization, nutrition, Ayurveda, and the chakras.

It has been over thirty years since he began this journey into an exciting world without limits.
And so it’s with much joy and pleasure that he has put forth his knowledge to create and develop GAIA THERAPEAT.

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